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Wikipedia: Project Galactic Guide
Project Galactic Guide
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Project Galactic Guide (PGG) is a collaborative project inspired by The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, the fictional encyclopedia in books by Douglas Adams. The project's FAQ describes PGG as a

[...]collaborative Internet attempt at creating an electronic reference meant to guide and misguide its readers in matters of life, death, and finding a parking space anywhere in the universe.[1]

PGG has three classifications for articles: real, unreal and semi-real. Real articles attempt to provide accurate, factual information in an amusing and enjoyable style. Unreal articles are for humour value only. Semi-real articles are a mix of both. All PGG articles have their classifications clearly marked the their titles to avoid confusing the reader.

History

Project Galactic Guide is one of the oldest Internet encyclopedia projects. The project was started in 1991 by participants of the alt.fan.douglas-adams newsgroup. Paul Jason Clegg proposed the idea of creating a real guide to the galaxy. Since the participants of the newsgroup had computers and programming skills, they developed the idea, creating software tools and writing articles, and The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Known Galaxy was born. Originally, Clegg wanted only factual articles in the guide, but the desire of contributors to write less than accurate material overruled Clegg's idea, and the project became known as Project Galactic Guide.

Work on the guide has slowed to a halt in recent years. The newest dated official article in the guide is Terschelling, Friesland, Netherlands, Earth (Real)[1], which was accepted July 7, 2000 (there is later article entitled Greek Cruises (Real), but it has no date[1]). The development of h2g2, which was backed by Douglas Adams and his company, The Digital Village, may be partially responsible for the lack of PGG participation.

PGG today

As of 2002, there are 1780 articles in the Project Galactic Guide.

The project's website is currently maintained by Alex McLintock. In October, 2002, he gave the following assement of PGG's status:

I still run the website and we usually get a few comments on articles each day... What we don't have is active editors who can help create new articles. So in that sense yes the PGG is dead.[1]

PGG has a wiki called the PGGWikit. It was implemented as an idea bank and collaboration area for draft articles. The wiki is active, but because of the lack of editors, no new material from the wiki has been added to the official PGG.

See also

External links


  

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. 
Modified by Geona